Hurricane Ida recently made landfall on Louisiana with catastrophic winds of 150 mph. Ida was initially a tropical cyclone as it makes its way through Cuba last Friday, August 27. However, Ida immediately escalated to a Category-4 hurricane as it travels across the Gulf of Mexico and bound to Louisiana. As soon as Hurricane Ida made landfall, there was an immediate drop in temperatures, storms, and heavy rain was dumped on Louisiana, and communities were left without power.

How Climate Change Makes Hurricanes Worse

Today, we want to talk about how hurricanes like Ida are impacted by climate change and what it's changing flood insurance.

Climate Change

It's important to note that climate change impacts how extreme weather events can become. We were able to discuss this on our previous blog which you can read by clicking here.

This devastating climate event is also changing how what was used to be minor hurricanes, now becoming more catastrophic and overnight tropical storms can transform into major hurricanes as we've seen with Ida. Generally, this is due to how it's directly impacting the weather, overall sea level, and surface temperatures of water from our oceans.

In 2019, Hurricane Dorian hit the country with the second strongest landfall with 185 mph. In 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall at 180 mph and Hurricane Maria also had 165 mph when the hurricane made landfall in the same year. This is generally due to rising ocean temperatures that fuel stronger North Atlantic Hurricanes.

How Climate Change Makes Hurricanes Worse

You see, as our climate becomes warmer, minor tropical storms also get powered by this heat and you can even say that it's like turning it up to eleven. Additionally, warmer waters also create more frequent and consistent heavy rainfall as water vapor is easily condensing into rain clouds due to that extra heat. As we've seen just this year, heavier rainfall and torrential rains can easily create devastating floods.

Earlier this year, we've seen areas like Baton Rouge in Louisiana, Nashville and Waverly in Tennessee, Monett in Missouri, and multiple areas in Alabama get about 7 to 15 inches of rain at a given time only to cause massive flooding and, at most time, deadly flash floods in these areas. 

How Climate Change Makes Hurricanes Worse

Flood Insurance Impacts

When it comes to flood insurance, especially federal flood insurance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), these types of considerations aren't made until the coming Fall season this year.

in the current version of the NFIP, one of the big determiners of flood risk and rates are mostly things such as flood zones, elevation, and history of flood data like claims. Honestly, this doesn't really address the actual flood risks of property owners and the overall population. Let's say that Property Owner A is not in a flood zone and Property Owner B is in a flood zone.

This creates a massive confusion between these two property owners as the former would not get insurance thinking that they won't need it "because they're not in a high-risk flood zone". However, we have proven true that these zone designations will never represent the overall flood risk of a property.

You can be outside of a flood zone, but if global warming suddenly melts all the snow from winter and starts to oversaturate the ground, rainwater will have nowhere to go other than these low-lying areas. Even small amounts of rain in given this type of situation, that water from precipitation — heavy precipitation or otherwise — can be enough to cause floods.

Sometimes since these floods have strong currents due to it naturally wanting to flow into low-lying areas, the flood damage is all increased significantly. Yes, even low-risk flood zones will be impacted.

The NFIP Risk Rating 2.0

This changes with the new Risk Rating 2.0 program which measures flood insurance rates based on the flood risk score. The Risk Rating 2.0 will easily measure how these types of flood risks from the ever-changing climate since it will start to look into the types of floods your property is receiving, how frequent floods happen in your area, and distance to any body of water.

The Risk Rating 2.0 program will also focus on flood insurance data that your property has when it comes to determining your rates or premiums. All of these will fall into what's called a flood risk score. Here are the things that are staying the same and the new things that will determine your rates with FEMA and NFIP:

Things that are staying the same:

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either a pluvial flood, fluvial flood, and coastal flood.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

How Climate Change Makes Hurricanes Worse

The impacts of climate change are something that we will never control and is already irreversible. However, we shouldn't focus on the things outside of our control, but on the things that we have power on such as preparing ourselves from these impacts on floods, tornadoes, tide storm, storm surge, hurricane strength by protecting ourselves from these impacts.

If you want to know more on how to get flood insurance, what is the Risk Rating 2.0, what your flood risk score is, click below to reach out.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Buy Flood Insurance Now!

Contact Us

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

For the past couple of months, we've been covering a lot about the changes coming to federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). This new Risk Rating 2.0 program might be sounding more familiar as we get closer to phase one of its releases.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Des Moines Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

Today, we want to cover these flood insurance changes to the city of Des Moines. Before that, we want everyone in the city and the state of Iowa to prepare themselves for any possible flooding that may happen due to Hurricane Ida.

Make sure to reach out to your community officials to ensure your property or reach out to us so we can help you protect your property. We've seen how this type of situation can create when it comes to flooding. Just this year's Spring season, Iowa faced a lot of flooding.

Contact Us

Iowa is sitting directly between both the Mississippi River and the Missouri River which immediately entails a problem when it comes to flooding and how easily flood levels can rise. I've been in this insurance industry for many years now and I have an educational background to make sure that I can help everyone understand how these flood threats can impact your buildings, your homes, and other personal property, and how flood water can move especially when it's caused by heavy rain.

So what's changing in De Moines, Iowa when it comes to the federal flood insurance with FEMA and the NFIP? What does this mean to your respective community when you're impacted? Let's talk about that, but first, let's do a brief review of the Risk Rating 2.0 program.

If you want to read more on FEMA and NFIP changes to Iowa in general, CLICK HERE to read our blog on Update for Iowa with Risk Rating 2.0.

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA.

Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner.

It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones) however flood insurance rate maps will only be used from a regulatory standpoint, not rating.
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to rain, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Now, let's talk about specifics and tackle the flood insurance rate changes coming to homes in Polk County and Des Moines.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Des Moines Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Des Moines City and Polk County.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 42% or 638 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 428 or 28.2% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 210 or 13.8% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 725 or 47.8% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in DuPage.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 49 or 3.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 100 or 7.9% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Polk county residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 8 or 0.5% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $70 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Iowa is about $1,115, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Des Moines Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes.

The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events and it's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Iowa, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below.

Buy Flood Insurance Now!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana on August 29, 2021, the same day 16 years ago that Katrina made landfall. The storm just might throw another vicious punch at the Ohio Valley area as it looks to bring flooding to an already heavy hit area.

How Will Hurricane Ida Impact Western Tennessee and Kentucky?

We've already talked about the possible results of Hurricane Ida on Louisiana and what approaches the state and the federal government made sure they did to ensure that something like Hurricane Katrina won't happen this year. If you want to read on that blog, click here so you can know more about this hurricane.

Today, we want to focus on the threats of Ida to western Tennessee and Kentucky, not only when it comes to flood, but also the general impact of this weather event on the two states.

Tennessee

The Volunteer State is in the hot seat — should we say wet one — when it comes to this type of weather event. Not a week ago, a small town in Humphreys County was devastated with a huge amount of flooding due to continuous rainfall and this caused a lot of troubling numbers to come up. At least 17 inches of rain was dumped on Humphreys County and Waverly alone. This easily led to very grim results as, unfortunately, this took the lives of at least 22 people and about 50 are still missing.

How Will Hurricane Ida Impact Western Tennessee and Kentucky?

Earlier this year, we also saw Nashville find itself in shambles during the Spring season overwhelmed the city, and caused flooding due to torrential rains. Franklin had at least 9 inches of rain throughout the two-day period of the heavy rain. The floods were caused mostly by pluvial factors where the already-oversaturated soil was no longer in shape to suck in more water and lead to immense flash floods. You also have to take into account the rising of the Cumberland River due to the continuous heavy rainfall. Sadly, this flash flood event also took 9 lives in its wake.

At the time of writing, News Channel 5 reported that a lot of threats of flash flooding will be brought about by this Storm Level 5 weather event across Tennessee. This immediately prompted a flash flood watch that was issued earlier today and will expire on Wednesday, September 1st. Aside from flash floods, you also have to watch out for possible catastrophic wind gusts and tornadoes as Ida continues its course.

How Will Hurricane Ida Impact Western Tennessee and Kentucky?

It's not absurd to think that what happened back in March will repeat itself. We're expecting a very strong hurricane with Ida and it's important that you have the right protection against floods, tornadoes, or even strong winds if you live in Tennessee. If you are inclined to evacuate, make sure that you don't leave your property unprotected and ensure that you take only the safest routes as we overcome this storm.

If you want to know more about flood insurance in Tennessee especially concerning the new National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0, CLICK HERE to check out our blog for it.

Kentucky

Although news and other reports say that when it comes to Kentucky, Hurricane Ida would have already lowered its intensity in comparison to the Category-4 hurricane that the state of Louisiana had to face this week. The National Weather Service (NWS) issued a flash flood warning in place as a preparation for the cold front that central Kentucky, areas like Lexington, and Louisville because once that rain starts, there's no stopping it even for a minute until the hurricane has passed to the East.

How Will Hurricane Ida Impact Western Tennessee and Kentucky?

We've seen this film before and no one liked the ending when it comes to continuous rainfall and you might even feel safer than anyone just because you're not in a flood zone or a high-risk flood zone. However, this doesn't really exempt you from any threats of flash floods. Always remember that when there's a huge amount of rain and water is no longer going in the ground, most of the time this will runoff to low-lying areas and even low-risk flood zones.

Kentucky, especially its central areas, can expect persistent showers of rain starting today up to Wednesday, September 1st. Keep in mind that even though reports would say that there are only about 2 - 5 inches of rain that the state can expect to receive, floods due to runoffs aren't out of the equation.

If you want to know more about flood insurance in Kentucky especially concerning the new National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0, CLICK HERE to check out our blog for it.

Hurricane Ida

Ida immediately escalated to a Category-4 after leaving Cuba on Friday and made landfall on the 16th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina at Louisiana and the New Orleans area specifically. Sustained winds of 150 MPH with gusty winds that go up to a Category-5. The hurricane was so intense that officials from Louisiana weren't able to order a mandatory evacuation for residents.

At the time of writing, the forecast of rainfall is significantly lower as Ida moves to the eastern coast of the country. Rainfall totals aren't expected to go higher than 6 inches as the hurricane is rapidly weakening as it goes through its course. 

Regardless, it's always better safe than sorry as even relatively small inches of rainfall can be as devastating as the heaviest rainfall. If you have questions on how to prepare and protect yourself and your property from this type of event, what your flood insurance options are in Louisiana, Tennessee, and Kentucky, or anything about floods, click below.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, avoid getting blindsided by weather events, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long term. You can use the links below to call us, email us, or get a quote from us.

Contact Us

Buy Flood Insurance Now!

For the past couple of months, we've been covering a lot about the changes coming to federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). This new Risk Rating 2.0 program might be sounding more familiar as we get closer to phase one of its releases.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Cedar Rapids Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

Today, we want to cover these flood insurance changes to the city of Cedar Rapids. Before that, we want everyone in the city and the state of Iowa to prepare themselves for any possible flooding that may happen due to Hurricane Ida.

Make sure to reach out to your community officials to ensure your property or reach out to us so we can help you protect your property. We've seen how this type of situation can create when it comes to flooding. Just this year's Spring season, Iowa faced a lot of flooding.

Contact Us

Iowa is sitting directly between both the Mississippi River and the Missouri River which immediately entails a problem when it comes to flooding and how easily flood levels can rise. I've been in this insurance industry for many years now and I have an educational background to make sure that I can help everyone understand how these flood threats can impact your buildings, your homes, and other personal property, and how flood water can move especially when it's caused by heavy rain.

So what's changing in De Moines, Iowa when it comes to the federal flood insurance with FEMA and the NFIP? What does this mean to your respective community when you're impacted? Let's talk about that, but first, let's do a brief review of the Risk Rating 2.0 program.

If you want to read more on FEMA and NFIP changes to Iowa in general, CLICK HERE to read our blog on Update for Iowa with Risk Rating 2.0.

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA.

Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner.

It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones) however flood insurance rate maps will only be used from a regulatory standpoint, not rating.
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to rain, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Now, let's talk about specifics and tackle the flood insurance rate changes coming to homes in Linn County and Cedar Rapids.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Cedar Rapids Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Cedar Rapids City and Linn County.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 42% or 638 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 428 or 28.2% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 210 or 13.8% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 725 or 47.8% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Linn.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 49 or 3.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 100 or 7.9% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Linn county residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 8 or 0.5% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $70 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters.

Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Iowa is about $1,115, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Iowa Flood Insurance Updates: Cedar Rapids Risk Rating 2.0 Changes

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes.

The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events and it's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Iowa, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below.

Buy Flood Insurance Now!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

We're sinking deeper into the hurricane and storm season. We've seen how much a consistent amount of heavy rainfall can easily increase water levels regardless if it's a high-risk flood zone or a low-risk area.

Ida Aims Louisiana: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

Today, we want to cover recent development from the National Hurricane Center about another possible major hurricane closing in New Orleans and Louisiana in general, Hurricane Ida. Considering that just earlier this year, Baton Rouge and its community were devastated by an extreme flooding event.

We want to help you understand how to set your expectations right about this storm event, what the government is expecting to do about it, what we've learned from Hurricane Katrina, and how to save yourself from the possible impacts of rain and flood the areas impacted especially New Orleans city.

If you want to read more on the upcoming changes to flood insurance, you can click here to read our Risk Rating 2.0 update for the state of Louisiana.

Ida Closes In

Louisiana is still recovering from the aftermath of the major storm, rain, or hurricane from last year. With this in mind, Governor John Bel Edwards immediately declared a state of emergency for the state as a major hurricane seems to have ideas of slamming the state after leaving Cuba on Friday.

According to AP News, the National Hurricane Center predicted Ida would strengthen into an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane, with maximum winds of 140 mph (225 KPH) before making landfall along the U.S. Gulf Coast late Sunday. The National Weather Service meteorologist Benjamin Schott even said that Hurricane Ida can be a life-altering event for those who aren't prepared for its impacts. We want everyone to participate in this emergency preparedness and emergency response. This time, hurricane preparations aren't just in the hands of emergency responders.

Ida Aims Louisiana: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

Consequentially, the mayor of New Orleans, LaToya Cantrell, gave out an emergency declaration for a mandatory evacuation for a small area in the city outside of the levee system. However, the mayor can't say the same for the whole city due to the lack of time.

This is why it's encouraged for the city sitting beside the Mississippi River to prepare themselves for any possible outcome of Tropical Storm Ida: be it catastrophic flooding via flash floods, huge amounts of rain, and unfathomably strong winds.

The state of Louisiana is doing everything it can with the help of emergency officials creating a concrete emergency game plan for the upcoming hurricane.

What We've Learned from Katrina

The expected date of Hurricane Ida landing in Louisiana is coincidentally going to be in the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Since these two hurricanes seem to be a clone of one another, it's best to look at the lessons learned from this massive hurricane event from 16 years ago.

Ida Aims Louisiana: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

Levees and Pump Repairs

One of the catalysts for the massive flooding during Hurricane Katrina was the failure of the levees. About 50 levees failed to protect New Orleans from floodwaters. In the research done by Tulane University, this was mostly due to erosion and overtopping. The failures of the overall engineering were then improved on 55 levees to ensure that no breach will ever occur in a future event.

It's important to keep in our thoughts that due to this levee failure, an estimated number of more than 1000 people lost their lives along with the billions of losses in damages.

Ida Aims Louisiana: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

Rebuilding New Orleans

With the help of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a lot of houses that were rebuilt followed some guidelines in order to prepare throughout any hurricane season. This includes how some property owners installed flood mitigation efforts on their homes like flood openings, elevating the house when it was being rebuilt, and making sure that the right foundation is established against floods.

This didn't mean that everyone got back on their feet as even now — sixteen years after hurricane Katrina — Louisiana and the city of New Orleans are still recovering from the damages brought about by Hurricane Katrina and another flooding in more recent times.

Ida Aims Louisiana: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

Flood Insurance Changes

One of the biggest things that we've learned from Hurricane Katrina as well as other major weather events like heavy rain, historic winter storm, dangerous storm surge, and things like that is how the flood insurance industry responded. This response came in the form of the new National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 Program.

This new program is aiming down its sight that everyone understands their risk of flooding and its impacts on people. There are a lot of new factors that will come into play when it comes to flood insurance and flood zones will only be from a regulatory standpoint. Many property owners get mislead by flood zones when it comes to the flood threats to them.

There are also many cases where a homeowner doesn't have flood insurance because they're in a low-risk flood zone. This Risk Rating 2.0 change can really help people understand that being in a low-risk flood zone doesn't mean you're in a no-risk flood zone.

It's important that we understand how floodwaters work, not just in general but also in their own specific area. Let's take Louisiana and New Orleans for example. Since most of the state is directly sitting on the coast, the federal government will start to rate you based on the types of flood you're getting and how frequent flooding is in your area.

In this way, it's easy to say that things like how prone your property is when it comes to life-threatening will also come into play when it comes to your rates with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the NFIP. 

Education, Awareness, and Preparedness

Regardless of these efforts made through the things we've learned, we still encourage residents of New Orleans and Louisiana to not hesitate if Hurricane Ida might be detrimental to you. It's easy to say that we'll survive it until we can't. We encourage you to make sure that you have the right protection through flood insurance, follow emergency evacuations, and ensure that you, your family, and your property are safe from any possible outcome.

We've witnessed just this quarter how some inches of rain can cause life-threatening flash floods across the country and at the end of the day, being educated, aware, and making sure that you'll also act on what you know will be your saving grace.

If you have any questions on flood insurance, what the Risk Rating 2.0 covers, what your options are in Louisiana, or anything about flood, click below to contact us.

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you with flood risks like hurricanes, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Be safe out there, Louisiana.

Buy Flood Insurance Now!

We have covered most of the changes with federal flood insurance in Illinois however that episode is mostly focused on Illinois as a state, not its respective cities. We want to help you understand the specifics of the impact of these changes especially since we're gearing ever closer to the update on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Illinois Flood Insurance: Risk Rating 2.0 Updates for Naperville, IL

Today, let's talk about Naperville, Illinois, home to Bulls, the Millennium Park, and The Bean, and how residents are going to be impacted by the upcoming Risk Rating 2.0 changes with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA.

Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones)
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Illinois Flood Insurance: Risk Rating 2.0 Updates for Naperville, IL

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of DuPage County.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 40.4% or 1,037 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 601 or 25.6% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 371 or 14.8% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 2,201 or 54.3% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in DuPage.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 106 or 2.6% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 83 or 2% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few DuPage residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 24 or 0.6% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Illinois is about $1100, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Illinois Flood Insurance: Risk Rating 2.0 Updates for Naperville, IL

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Naperville, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

We have covered most of the changes with federal flood insurance in Illinois however that episode is mostly focused on Illinois as a state, not its respective cities. We want to help you understand the specifics of the impact of these changes especially since we're gearing ever closer to the update on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Illinois Flood Insurance: Chicago Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Today, let's talk about Chicago, Illinois, home to Bulls, the Millennium Park, and The Bean, and how residents are going to be impacted by the upcoming Risk Rating 2.0 changes with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones)
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Illinois Flood Insurance: Chicago Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Cook County.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 52.3% or 6,408 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 3,374 or 27.5% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 3,034 or 24.7% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 5,134 or 41.9% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Cook.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 384 or 3.1% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 251 or 2% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Cook residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 86 or 0.7% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Illinois is about $1100, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Illinois Flood Insurance: Chicago Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Chicago, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Maybe it's not nature that causes our issues with natural disasters. Sometimes we have a hand on it too.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

For the last 15-20 years Alabama has been known as tornado alley. It's known for one of the deadliest tornado days in history during the April 2011 tornado outbreak. This super outbreak lasted for 3 days, 7 hours, and 18 minutes with the highest winds that went to more than 200 mph on Hackleburg and Phil Campbell, Alabama. The damages of this outbreak surpassed the $10 billion mark and unfortunately took more than 300 lives and 3000 injuries.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

As you can imagine tornado awareness and preparation have been very crucial and is the flavor of the hurricane season so much that flood threats were sidelined, if not fully benched at the back of people's minds.

However, a question we have been getting a lot lately; what should we all be asking too, is flooding in Alabama increasing? If so, then why is it happening?

In this article, we're going to take a look at some recent flood events throughout the state and see why these events might have occurred. We are also going to look at some things that might be contributing to flooding in Alabama.

Alabama and Flood

In order to understand to answer these questions, we want to look at the recent data we got on flooding across the state from the last 3 years as these historic floods can really show the changes happening to flood in Alabama.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

2018

May 2018, the United States was ravaged by Tropical Storm Alberto even before the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season. This disaster event caused both Alabama and Florida to be in constant flash flood warnings due to how strong Alberto was. Now, this was one of the biggest storms that the country faced, but for this article, we want to focus on its impacts on Alabama.

Alabama faced more than 3.5 inches of rainfall and in Cloverdale, this even went up to more than 8 inches. Ever since the storm started to cause heavy rainfall to the country, Alabama faced a lot of issues when it comes to floods. This caused a lot of flooding and winds that we've seen strong enough to have localized tree damages within the state. 

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

September 2018, Alabama faced another headache through Tropical Storm Gordon. Eight counties were in a state of emergency during this period. Brighton faced about 4 inches of rainfall and the state also saw a number of floodings during the storm event. Dauphin Island faced a storm surge of 3 to 5 feet causing minor flooding. Further inland, we've seen rainfalls going up to 8 inches which caused a lot of streets to seem like rivers, dirt roads being washed away, and flooding in several rivers.

October 2018, Hurricane Michael caused catastrophic $25 billion in damages across the country, but to Dothan, the strong winds and heavy rainfall were just the beginning. Farmers faced a lot of trouble on their livelihood as their expected great batch of cotton crops was turned to nothing. Orange Beach was also flooded due to the Hurricane.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

2019

In July 2019, Hurricane Barry dumped more than 8 inches of rainfall in Fairhope city. Mobile County also saw most of its roadways underwater due to coastal flooding and torrential rainfall overwhelmed the sewer systems that it spilled over 80,000 gallons of floodwater into the streets.

In December 2019, Tennessee and Alabama faced huge flash flooding after a record rainfall where the former saw 2.5 inches of rainfall. This, unfortunately, took two lives, one for each state. Lauderdale saw its roads also submerged with this flood.

2020

February 2020, strong to severe storms was expected to go through the state. This caused power loss for about 5,000 people at the time, damage to Highway 43 and County Road 54, and sadly taking one life.

This storm also saw water coming over banks that evacuation efforts needed to be done in Crescent of Lakeshore Apartments in Homewood. The same apartment saw cars with only the top of it above water. The overflow in Shades Creek also saw Lakeshore Trail look like a river during the storm.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

September 2020, Hurricane Sally dumped 30 inches of rain in Orange Beach, Alabama. This caused storm surge flooding to occur in Dauphin Island. We also saw flood damage in Spanish Fort where one gas station was completely destroyed after being inundated with water. This was also enough to have some sewer systems overflow contaminating Dog River and Rabbit Creek. Overall damages from this disaster were well over $300 million and took two lives in its wake with one missing.

For years Mobile and Baldwin counties have been known as the main flood areas. These are Alabama coastal areas that can receive flooding from tropical systems.

Simply put, these counties are ones that experience much stronger storms due to coastal storms they experience and deeper floods since one of the known coastal flood risks are facing that water level rise significantly due to heavy rains.

Are Floods Increasing?

Now, we've seen how progressively worse flooding has been changing throughout recent years. This is also the same when it comes to the cost of flooding when it comes to damages to properties. This immediately answers the question, but the more important is the follow-up: Why?

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

It's important to acknowledge that storms, weather patterns, extreme heat, and extreme rain events are results of climate change and we've already covered this in our previous blog. Today, we want to focus on a more unnoticed contributor to flooding across Alabama: development efforts.

The United States has been consistently becoming more urbanized, this means that most of the areas where there is natural vegetation, trees, and flora are being removed, graded, and then these efforts will simply build a drainage system that generally streams into natural bodies of water like lakes or in this case with Alabama, creeks, rivers, and coasts.

Generally, an untouched area where the flora or plants aren't interfered with can collect 90% of the rainfall as a resulting impact of storm systems. However, due to these types of developments, it can go down to only absorbing 10% of it.

Is Alabama Flooding Increasing?

In 2003, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) researched on this and found that heavily urbanized areas, including ones that are still being developed, saw a 100% increase in large floods and a 200% increase in smaller floods. The depth of flooding is also impacted as we are experiencing more overflows due to channels like drainage or sewer systems being overwhelmed by floodwater. This type of issue puts low-risk properties at risk of facing floods that they've never experienced before.

The research also found that floods in areas where developments cause sediments to somewhat clog water channels and as we've discussed before with Flood Zone AO and causes of flooding in low-risk flood zones, the water is being redirected to another area and mostly ones that are heavily populated.

The chance of flood is also directly impacted by these developments if we're not putting the right channels for water to naturally flow. Once this type of water, which should be scattering and being sipped by the soil, starts to rapidly flow into communities. What was before shallow flood events can easily become biblical flood events for those who are impacted.

This research shows future projections of what we can expect in the near future if we're not careful. This is why it's always important to understand flood maps and check with flood risk modelers to understand how a development project can cause problems for the natural flow of floodwaters.

If you have questions on flooding in Alabama, how to utilize your flood insurance policy to protect yourself, what are your flood insurance options, or anything about flood, reach out to us. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation and we want to help you understand flood risks through education and awareness in flood insurance and preparedness.

The Flood Insurance Guru | Chris Greene | YouTubeGet Your Quote from Flood Insurance GuruThe Flood Insurance Guru | 2054514294

We're getting closer to the major federal flood insurance changes with the Risk Rating 2.0. A lot of things will be looked into by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). These flood risk factors are the fingerprint of your flood insurance since it will determine whether or not you'll get a rate increase or decrease on your policy on the Risk Rating 2.0 kicks in.

Pluvial Flood: Flash Flooding and Surface Water Flooding

In today's episode, we want to talk about pluvial flood and understand its cause, give some examples, and see why FEMA and the NFIP would count this in as well as other flood types for your insurance. Be sure to also watch the video below for this blog:

 

Pluvial Flood

pluvial flood or pluvial flooding is generally a flood event an area experiences due to rainfall. This pertains to the collective amount of rain that was dumped into an area creating a pool and flooding the community. We've seen this happen in recent times when the lands of Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia,  and North Carolina were flooded after getting heavy rainfall for a short period of time.

Now, I've mentioned that a pluvial flood is due to rain and we can see this in two forms. One is the less dangerous surface water flooding and the more devastating flash flood. Looking at the affected areas in the recent Southwestern flooding saw a lot of urban flash flooding. Generally, you'll see these types of flooding when the urban drainage can't handle the surface water floods.

Pluvial Flood: Flash Flooding and Surface Water Flooding

This creates a ripple effect to the water: some would seep into the ground, some would flow into low-lying areas which is what's called a "runoff", and even worse creating a fluvial flood or river flooding when they flow into these bodies of water.

We'll cover more on fluvial flooding in a future episode.

One of the biggest problems with a pluvial flood is that flood warnings can last at an unexpectedly long time since sometimes the flood just won't recede. Why does this happen?

Pluvial Flood Risks

When it comes to pluvial flood risks, this is one of the situations when we say you don't need to be in a flood zone A in flood risk maps to be flooded. Pluvial flood is one of the proofs that even low-risk flood zones get flooded and why FEMA always reports that at least 25% of flood insurance claims come from these areas.

Another important thing to note about pluvial flood risks is that one moment it's just still surface water or groundwater flooding, but can escalate to rapid moving torrents which causes massive flood damage, flood losses for heavily developed areas. This is why urban flooding is becoming a big issue across the country since one heavy precipitation can create flooding from surface water.

If you have questions on how to best protect yourself from pluvial floods, what type of flood your area or property experiences, or anything about flood insurance, click below to see your flood risk score.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand your flood risks, flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

We've been doing a lot of updates for you when it comes to the changes on flood insurance rates per state and per city in those states. In those blogs, we've mentioned a lot about what stays and what changes in federal flood insurance once the new program kicks in.

Everything Risk Rating 2.0: Flood Insurance Coverages with NFIP

Today, we'll do a deep dive on these changes with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policies itself, how it works, how you will be rated, and understanding how flood insurance will work with the new Risk Rating 2.0.

We want to talk about the specifics of how Risk Rating 2.0 or NFIP 2.0 will impact the coverages in flood insurance for both residential and commercial policies. So how will flood insurance coverage change with the new Risk Rating 2.0 program?

Risk Rating 2.0

First, let's discuss what this new program is all about. The Risk Rating 2.0 is a new setup for federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that aims to provide policyholders across the United State a rating structure that eliminates any rating disparities and get people more accurate flood insurance rates with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Everything Risk Rating 2.0: Flood Insurance Coverages with NFIP

This new program is equity in action and will consider a lot of old and new rating factors when it comes to flood insurance. These factors and conditions are the things that the Risk Rating 2.0 will consider and can also help you determine if you're going to get a premium increase or rate increase just by looking at your property details. We'll talk more on the specifics in our future blogs on this, but to give a brief preview here are the things that impact your rate which will stay with the Risk Rating 2.0:

  • Flood zone designation based on community flood maps.
  • Distance of the property to a body of water.
  • Prior flood insurance claims or history of flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and policy transfer.
  • The grandfather rule.
  • Pre-FIRM subsidies or Pre-Flood Insurance Rate Map discounts.

The new things that will also impact your rates. These things are more focused on individual properties, so there's a fingerprint of flood risk when it comes to the Risk Rating 2.0. This is to say that your rate won't be the same as your neighbors:

  • Types of flooding that your property experience.
  • Flood frequency impacting the community and your property.
  • First-floor height or distance of the first livable area to grade (ground).
  • Elevation of the structure or the property itself.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property.

Again, we'll talk more about these in future episodes, but for now, we want to focus on the impact on flood coverage so that property owners and insurance agents alike can get an understanding of this. One step at a time.

Flood Insurance Coverage 2.0

Now, we get to the hot stuff, what changes when it comes to flood insurance coverage with the National Flood Insurance Program under the Risk Rating 2.0?

Well, I have to break it to you, but so far nothing changes. Which doesn't mean that they won't change in the future. There's a lot of things coming into play when it comes to coverage amount or limits — I mean we're still going through a pandemic.

Everything Risk Rating 2.0: Flood Insurance Coverages with NFIP

Generally, this means that residential and commercial properties will still get that coverage for flood damage on dwelling and contents. By dwelling, this means the insured building or your house itself whereas contents will be the things that are inside the dwelling. Let's get down to specifics for everyone's awareness.

Dwelling coverage from FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will cover the flood damage to the construction impacted by the flood like walls, ceilings, roofs, fences, floor surfaces, water heaters, furnaces, air-conditioning systems. This coverage will also include everything that goes into the cleanup and debris removal. The coverage for dwelling on residential properties is maxed at $250,000 however for commercial properties, this coverage is $500,000 maximum.

Everything Risk Rating 2.0: Flood Insurance Coverages with NFIP

Contents coverage on the other hand is more concerned with the personal property you have within the insured dwelling or building. This means that you will get covered for a maximum amount of $100,000 for clothes, washers, dryers, television, furniture, and other personal belongings that were impacted by flood damage. This amount will be the same regardless if you're carrying a commercial or residential policy.

Everything Risk Rating 2.0: Flood Insurance Coverages with NFIP

What's important to note about coverage is that there's still the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) which can make you legible for additional flood insurance coverage the NFIP. Quick disclaimer, you and your community will have to apply for this one in order to make sure that you're legible to get it. So what's this coverage you ask?

Increased Cost of Compliance

One of the things that won't change with the NFIP as the Risk Rating 2.0 kicks is the ICC or Increased Cost of Compliance. This coverage is something we can call additional since this is mostly provided at $30,000 maximum for policyholders and is intended to ensure that you will reduce the impact, if not the overall risk of flooding on the listed property. Generally, this involves flood mitigation efforts such as the installation of flood openings and the labor that goes into making that happen.

When Will Risk Rating 2.0 Happen?

It's important to know this information before you move into federal flood insurance or move to the private market. This new Risk Rating 2.0 program will change flood insurance policies across the United States starting this October 1st, 2021 for new business or new policyholders.

On the other hand, if you're going to have a renewal, you can choose to not adapt until April 1st, 2022 since this is the date the FEMA aims to have the new program take full effect on all flood insurance policyholders.

For now, we wait for updates with the coverages, but this is just one of the things that really won't change with the Risk Rating 2.0. If you have any questions on coverages in flood insurance, your flood risk fingerprint, or anything at all about floods and flood insurance, reach out to us by clicking below.

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

We have covered most of the changes with federal flood insurance in Hawaii however that episode is mostly focused on Hawaii in general. We want to help you understand the specifics of the impact of these changes especially since we're gearing ever closer to the update on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Hawaii Flood Insurance: Honolulu Risk Rating 2.0 Updates

Today, let's talk about one of the most famous getaway places when talking about unmatchable coastlines, glowing beaches, and dazzling sunsets, Honolulu, Hawaii, and how residents are going to be impacted by the upcoming Risk Rating 2.0 changes with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

Hawaii Flood Insurance: Honolulu Risk Rating 2.0 Updates

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Flood zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (FIRM). This includes identifying if you're in the special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones.
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood risk mitigation measures were made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Hawaii Flood Insurance: Honolulu Risk Rating 2.0 Updates

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Honoluluwick.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 7.3% or 2,897 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 1,030 or 26.1% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 371 or 9.4% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 33,725 or 84.7% of the policies in Honolulu itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Honoluluwick.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 1,382 or 3.5% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 1,688 or 4.2% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see Honolulu residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 148 or 0.4% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Hawaii is about $700, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Hawaii Flood Insurance: Honolulu Risk Rating 2.0 Updates

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Hawaii, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, as we move closer to the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 update, we want to answer the question: "Will Risk Rating 2.0 eliminate private flood insurance?"

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

Ever since I've started working in the insurance industry, a lot of back and forth has been going between federal flood insurance and private flood insurance. A lot of communities have also been plagued by the question, where can I get the best flood insurance policies?

First, let's know the contenders for your flood insurance option. As you'd know, we have the federal flood insurance once again battling it out with the private flood insurance, but does this upgrade to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program be enough to take the throne when it comes to flood insurance policies? Coming back stronger and better the second time. Is 2.0 a pretender or contender?

Tale of the Tape: NFIP Risk Rating 2.0

We've covered in our previous blog what the Risk Rating 2.0 is, but let's do a quick review.

FEMA has been going about with a lot of flood studies preparing themselves for this new update. The Risk Rating 2.0 is one of this equipment in fighting flood damage for communities across the country. This new update is equity in action since the main goal of this update is to change how flood insurance premiums are being rated.

The federal flood insurance is gearing towards a fingerprint of flood risk for properties that get a policy from them since rates will be based on the individual flood risk. Although this makes it more affordable for flood insurance coming from FEMA, this may still bring an increase to rates for some property owners.

This type of change makes them a big contender to take the spot when you ask people where best to get flood insurance however it's integral to point out that other than how you're going to be rated, some things never change with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) flood insurance.

When it comes to coverage, we're still talking about the same $250,000 maximum on dwelling or building coverage and $100,000 maximum when it comes to contents. 

Other than these, these are all that the federal government can offer when it comes to flood insurance even with the Risk Rating 2.0 update. Here's a quick breakdown of the NFIP 2.0 card compared to the current version we have at the time of writing:

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

Tale of The Tape: Private Flood

Private flood insurance has made a big push in the last 15 years. There have been a lot of changes in the last 5 years that allow private flood insurance to be a great flood insurance option for many property owners. Let's look at exactly what private flood insurance is.

Private flood insurance is a flood insurance policy that is through a private flood insurance company instead of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

For many years the only option for many property owners was the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). There were many limitations with this program like wait periods, coverage amounts, and cost of the policy.

As a result, there has been a big push for private flood insurance because of the many advantages it offers. It's important to understand not all private flood insurance options are the same.

There are admitted and non-admitted carriers in the private market. Each one of these types of policies has different requirements they follow.

The private flood insurance market still offers flood coverage that doesn't really have any maximum amount. You can definitely still get more than $250,000. Even when it comes to personal items or contents coverage, you can definitely go more than $100,000 for flood damage. That coverage also comes with the loss of use, additional living expenses, and/or replacement costs.

Already, we're still seeing better numbers when it comes to the private flood market. When talking about flood insurance rates, there's also more flexibility to the punch of private flood insurers. The average premium in private flood insurance is also significantly lower compared to its counterpart with the NFIP.

We've also seen a lot of homeowners coming to us for flood insurance and were able to get it in just a few days. The maximum waiting period for a flood policy from a private insurance company is only 14 days.

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

October 1, 2021 approaches NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 is scheduled to go into place. There are some big changes to this program like how rates are determined and the requirement for elevation certificates.

Traditionally if a property was considered a post-FIRM, or post-Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) structure, and it was in a special flood hazard area (SFHA) more than likely an elevation certificate would be required just to get a quote through FEMA.

Pre-FIRM structures are structures that were built before the first flood insurance rate map in an area. Post-FIRM structures are structures that were built after the first flood insurance rate map in an area. Now there are some exceptions that could change the status of a property like additions and substantial improvements.

If you are like me and see private flood insurance advertisements every day one of the things they advertise is no elevation certificate is required. That's great you may not need one of these but it doesn't mean you are getting the best look at your flood risk or even the best flood premium.

The new NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 will cover property owners to use an elevation certificate or let FEMA look at other data to determine the rate. This could take away one of the advantages that private flood insurance advertises.

While private flood insurance may lose this advantage they still hold many others like

  • Wait periods
  • Coverages
  • Flood Risk Scores
  • Flood zones

Wait periods

The waiting period is the time between when a policy goes into effect and when claims could be covered. The length of this waiting period varies depending on where you live, but it can be anywhere from one to thirty days. The longest wait period currently in the flood insurance market is the National Flood Insurance Program with its standard 30-day wait period. On private flood insurance many times it can range from 1 day to 15 days. It's important that both offer a no waiting period for loan closings.

Coverages

Coverages might be the area that separates the National Flood Insurance Program from private flood insurance the most.

The National Flood Insurance Program currently limits residential coverage to $250,000 on the building and $100,000 on contents with no loss of use coverage. Other than the Community Rating System (CRS) discount and some additional coverage for flood mitigation through the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

Private flood insurance can go up into the millions for building coverage. When it comes to contents coverage the coverage can be much higher than $100,000. In fact, we recently helped a customer get over $1 million in contents coverage with a private flood insurance policy.

Loss of use is also a big coverage that is getting attention, especially on commercial flood insurance policies. This could help a business continue to get income that was lost as a result of a flood. This is something that the National Flood Insurance Program does not offer.

Flood Risk Scores

Flood risk scores is a scorecard private companies have been using to determine if they will take on a certain risk. The higher the score, the harder it may be to get private flood insurance. Many times these scores can increase after recent floods in certain areas. We saw this happen in the Midland Michigan area after a dam failure. We have also seen this happen in the Sacramento California area with their current dam and levee situation.

In years past, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has not really used this model. However, once NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 is released they will have their own model. It will include things like replacement cost of a building, distance to water, flood frequency, type of flooding, and claims frequency. These things could give people a more accurate flood insurance rate through the National Flood Insurance Program compared to years past.

Flood Zones

One area that has misled a lot of people is the relationship between flood zones and flood risk.

We hear people say every day "FEMA has me in a low-risk flood zone, so I don't need flood insurance". It's important to understand that in the future FEMA won't be using these zones to determine rates any longer. Instead, they will be taking more of the flood risk score model.

Private flood insurance companies have been using this for a while. In fact, we have seen when you change the flood zone with a private flood insurance company that the rate doesn't change at all.

So the great debate the National Flood Insurance Program versus private flood insurance. Which one is better?

This is a question we get on a daily basis. There can be advantages and disadvantages to both. The development of this new program could help make this even more debatable. We should start to see if FEMA has done enough to update this program when it releases on October 1, 2021, across the country.

So if you have questions about how to understand flood insurance or how to lower your flood risk then make sure to click below.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!You can also check out our Youtube channel where we do daily flood education videos. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand your flood insurance options, your flood risks, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, as we move closer to the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 update, we want to answer the question: "Will Risk Rating 2.0 eliminate private flood insurance?"

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

Ever since I've started working in the insurance industry, a lot of back and forth has been going between federal flood insurance and private flood insurance. A lot of communities have also been plagued by the question, where can I get the best flood insurance policies?

First, let's know the contenders for your flood insurance option. As you'd know, we have the federal flood insurance once again battling it out with the private flood insurance, but does this upgrade to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program be enough to take the throne when it comes to flood insurance policies? Coming back stronger and better the second time. Is 2.0 a pretender or contender?

Tale of the Tape: NFIP Risk Rating 2.0

We've covered in our previous blog what the Risk Rating 2.0 is, but let's do a quick review.

FEMA has been going about with a lot of flood studies preparing themselves for this new update. The Risk Rating 2.0 is one of this equipment in fighting flood damage for communities across the country. This new update is equity in action since the main goal of this update is to change how flood insurance premiums are being rated.

The federal flood insurance is gearing towards a fingerprint of flood risk for properties that get a policy from them since rates will be based on the individual flood risk. Although this makes it more affordable for flood insurance coming from FEMA, this may still bring an increase to rates for some property owners.

This type of change makes them a big contender to take the spot when you ask people where best to get flood insurance however it's integral to point out that other than how you're going to be rated, some things never change with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) flood insurance.

When it comes to coverage, we're still talking about the same $250,000 maximum on dwelling or building coverage and $100,000 maximum when it comes to contents. 

Other than these, these are all that the federal government can offer when it comes to flood insurance even with the Risk Rating 2.0 update. Here's a quick breakdown of the NFIP 2.0 card compared to the current version we have at the time of writing:

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

Tale of The Tape: Private Flood

Private flood insurance has made a big push in the last 15 years. There have been a lot of changes in the last 5 years that allow private flood insurance to be a great flood insurance option for many property owners. Let's look at exactly what private flood insurance is.

Private flood insurance is a flood insurance policy that is through a private flood insurance company instead of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

For many years the only option for many property owners was the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). There were many limitations with this program like wait periods, coverage amounts, and cost of the policy.

As a result, there has been a big push for private flood insurance because of the many advantages it offers. It's important to understand not all private flood insurance options are the same.

There are admitted and non-admitted carriers in the private market. Each one of these types of policies has different requirements they follow.

The private flood insurance market still offers flood coverage that doesn't really have any maximum amount. You can definitely still get more than $250,000. Even when it comes to personal items or contents coverage, you can definitely go more than $100,000 for flood damage. That coverage also comes with the loss of use, additional living expenses, and/or replacement costs.

Already, we're still seeing better numbers when it comes to the private flood market. When talking about flood insurance rates, there's also more flexibility to the punch of private flood insurers. The average premium in private flood insurance is also significantly lower compared to its counterpart with the NFIP.

We've also seen a lot of homeowners coming to us for flood insurance and were able to get it in just a few days. The maximum waiting period for a flood policy from a private insurance company is only 14 days.

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

The Rematch: NFIP 2.0 vs Private Flood

October 1, 2021 approaches NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 is scheduled to go into place. There are some big changes to this program like how rates are determined and the requirement for elevation certificates.

Traditionally if a property was considered a post-FIRM, or post-Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) structure, and it was in a special flood hazard area (SFHA) more than likely an elevation certificate would be required just to get a quote through FEMA.

Pre-FIRM structures are structures that were built before the first flood insurance rate map in an area. Post-FIRM structures are structures that were built after the first flood insurance rate map in an area. Now there are some exceptions that could change the status of a property like additions and substantial improvements.

If you are like me and see private flood insurance advertisements every day one of the things they advertise is no elevation certificate is required. That's great you may not need one of these but it doesn't mean you are getting the best look at your flood risk or even the best flood premium.

The new NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 will cover property owners to use an elevation certificate or let FEMA look at other data to determine the rate. This could take away one of the advantages that private flood insurance advertises.

While private flood insurance may lose this advantage they still hold many others like

  • Wait periods
  • Coverages
  • Flood Risk Scores
  • Flood zones

Wait periods

The waiting period is the time between when a policy goes into effect and when claims could be covered. The length of this waiting period varies depending on where you live, but it can be anywhere from one to thirty days. The longest wait period currently in the flood insurance market is the National Flood Insurance Program with its standard 30-day wait period. On private flood insurance many times it can range from 1 day to 15 days. It's important that both offer a no waiting period for loan closings.

Coverages

Coverages might be the area that separates the National Flood Insurance Program from private flood insurance the most.

The National Flood Insurance Program currently limits residential coverage to $250,000 on the building and $100,000 on contents with no loss of use coverage. Other than the Community Rating System (CRS) discount and some additional coverage for flood mitigation through the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

Private flood insurance can go up into the millions for building coverage. When it comes to contents coverage the coverage can be much higher than $100,000. In fact, we recently helped a customer get over $1 million in contents coverage with a private flood insurance policy.

Loss of use is also a big coverage that is getting attention, especially on commercial flood insurance policies. This could help a business continue to get income that was lost as a result of a flood. This is something that the National Flood Insurance Program does not offer.

Flood Risk Scores

Flood risk scores is a scorecard private companies have been using to determine if they will take on a certain risk. The higher the score, the harder it may be to get private flood insurance. Many times these scores can increase after recent floods in certain areas. We saw this happen in the Midland Michigan area after a dam failure. We have also seen this happen in the Sacramento California area with their current dam and levee situation.

In years past, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has not really used this model. However, once NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 is released they will have their own model. It will include things like replacement cost of a building, distance to water, flood frequency, type of flooding, and claims frequency. These things could give people a more accurate flood insurance rate through the National Flood Insurance Program compared to years past.

Flood Zones

One area that has misled a lot of people is the relationship between flood zones and flood risk.

We hear people say every day "FEMA has me in a low-risk flood zone, so I don't need flood insurance". It's important to understand that in the future FEMA won't be using these zones to determine rates any longer. Instead, they will be taking more of the flood risk score model.

Private flood insurance companies have been using this for a while. In fact, we have seen when you change the flood zone with a private flood insurance company that the rate doesn't change at all.

So the great debate the National Flood Insurance Program versus private flood insurance. Which one is better?

This is a question we get on a daily basis. There can be advantages and disadvantages to both. The development of this new program could help make this even more debatable. We should start to see if FEMA has done enough to update this program when it releases on October 1, 2021, across the country.

So if you have questions about how to understand flood insurance or how to lower your flood risk then make sure to click below.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!You can also check out our Youtube channel where we do daily flood education videos. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand your flood insurance options, your flood risks, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Atlanta in Fulton County, Georgia.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Atlanta Risk Rating 2.0 Update

We've already covered the state of Georgia and the changes that it will get when it comes to the average cost of standard policies from the NFIP through the Risk Rating 2.0. This new program is something that both federal and community officials have been working on to make sure that they will level your flood insurance investments depending on your individual risks.

We want to talk about major counties in Georgia, just like Fulton County which is the home to Atlanta-Fulton Stadium, the Braves, and awesome street arts, and really understand the impacts of the new Risk Rating 2.0 from FEMA.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Atlanta Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones)
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Atlanta, Fulton County. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Atlanta Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Atlanta.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 35.5% or 1,401 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 1,030 or 26.1% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 371 or 9.4% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 2,374 or 60.1% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Atlanta.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 92 or 2.3% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 74 or 1.9% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Atlanta residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 7 or 0.2% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Georgia is about $700, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Atlanta Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Georgia, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Savannah Risk Rating 2.0 Update

We've already covered the state of Georgia and the changes that it will get when it comes to the average cost of standard policies from the NFIP through the Risk Rating 2.0. This new program is something that both federal and community officials have been working on to make sure that they will level your flood insurance investments depending on your individual risks.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Savannah Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables from expansive flood studies. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

  • Zone designation in the flood insurance rate map (e.g. special flood hazard areas (SFHA) or preferred flood zones)
  • Distance to a body of water such as a river, lake, or even the coastline
  • Prior flood insurance claims or flood claims made with the property
  • Policy assumption and grandfather rule

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Savannah, Chatham County. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Savannah Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Savannah.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 17.7% or 4,948 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 3,487 or 12.5% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 1,461 or 5.2% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 21,040 or 75.4% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Savannah.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 1,446 or 5.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 443 or 1.6% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Savannah residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 45 or 0.2% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Georgia is about $700, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Savannah Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Georgia, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Brunswick in Glynn County, Georgia.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Brunswick NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA.

Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • Type of floods in the area. Is it from the coast? Is it pluvial or collected water from a storm?
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard determination, floodplain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure.
  • Mitigation efforts on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Brunswick, Glynn County. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Georgia Flood Insurance: Brunswick NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Brunswick.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 27.2% or 3,731 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 2,720 or 19.8% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 1,011 or 7.4% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 8,973 or 65.4% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Brunswick.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 707 or 5.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 282 or 2.1% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Brunswick residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 19 or 0.1% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Georgia is about $700, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

Georgia Flood Insurance: Brunswick NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Georgia, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Fort Lauderdale City in Broward County, Florida.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

It's no secret that the coastal city of Miami has been had its fair share of floods throughout history and this is the same for Fort Lauderdale especially if you look at how Middle River cuts on some of its areas. The state as a whole itself is no stranger to different types of floods. You have these floods that come from the coast, one that's collected throughout a long period during a storm, and runoff from higher places.

If you want to read more on the Florida Risk Rating 2.0 update, click here!

So today, we want to discuss how the new Risk Rating 2.0 will impact your flood insurance policy with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and see if these changes to flood insurance premium gives the federal flood insurance to the more popular private sector which offers replacement cost.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

The remaining features are as follows:

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things. This also takes into account flood frequency in Fort Lauderdale.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

These changes are best handled with your flood insurance agent in order to get your flood risk score. If you need help in knowing your flood risk score, click the link below.

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Fort Lauderdale. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Fort Lauderdale.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease on average rates can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 22.2% or 42,740 NFIP-insured properties in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 39,294 or 20.4% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 3,446 or 1.8% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 141,284 or 73.2% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Fort Lauderdale.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 5,806 or 3% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 1.4% will experience. Now, when talking about a percent this number seems so small however it's important to note that we're still talking about 2,800 properties in Fort Lauderdale. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see a good number of Fort Lauder residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 334 or 0.2% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Florida is about $600, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance cover damages to a dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Florida, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Miami City in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

It's no secret that the coastal city of Miami has been had its fair share of floods throughout history. The state as a whole itself is no stranger to different types of floods. You have these floods that come from the coast, one that's collected throughout a long period during a storm, and runoff from higher places.

Florida Flood Insurance: Miami NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

So today, we want to discuss how the new Risk Rating 2.0 will impact your flood insurance policy with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and see if these changes to flood insurance premium gives the federal flood insurance to the more popular private sector which offers replacement cost.

If you want to read more on the Florida Risk Rating 2.0 update, click here!

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

Florida Flood Insurance: Miami NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

The remaining features are as follows:

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Miami. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Florida Flood Insurance: Miami NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Miami.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 22.2% or 77,092 NFIP-insured properties in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 70,074 or 20.2% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers a 7,018 or 2% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 246,303 or 71.1% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Miami.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 13,797 or 4% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 8,461 or 2.4% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Miami residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 1,015 or 0.5% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Florida is about $600, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Florida Flood Insurance: Miami NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Florida, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Fort Lauderdale City in Broward County, Florida.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

It's no secret that the coastal city of Miami has been had its fair share of floods throughout history and this is the same for Fort Lauderdale especially if you look at how Middle River cuts on some of its areas. The state as a whole itself is no stranger to different types of floods. You have these floods that come from the coast, one that's collected throughout a long period during a storm, and runoff from higher places.

If you want to read more on the Florida Risk Rating 2.0 update, click here!

So today, we want to discuss how the new Risk Rating 2.0 will impact your flood insurance policy with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and see if these changes to flood insurance premium gives the federal flood insurance to the more popular private sector which offers replacement cost.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes, and higher-valued homes or expensive properties will cause a big headache for the property owner. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables. There are things that are staying and changing when it comes to calculating your flood risk score.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

The remaining features are as follows:

The new things that will come with the Risk Rating 2.0 are as follows:

  • Types of floods that your property experience. This can be either pluvial or the accumulated water due to heavy rainfall, runoff of collected water that flows from higher areas, storm surge and coastal erosion, dam/levee damage or overflow, and even a combination of these things. This also takes into account flood frequency in Fort Lauderdale.
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure. A new feature that determines your flood risk score is the distance between the ground (grade) from your first floor or the first habitable floor of your property.
  • Flood Risk Mitigation Measures made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

These changes are best handled with your flood insurance agent in order to get your flood risk score. If you need help in knowing your flood risk score, click the link below.

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Fort Lauderdale. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Florida Flood Insurance: Fort Lauderdale Risk NFIP Rating 2.0

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Fort Lauderdale.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease on average rates can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 22.2% or 42,740 NFIP-insured properties in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 39,294 or 20.4% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 3,446 or 1.8% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 141,284 or 73.2% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Fort Lauderdale.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 5,806 or 3% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 1.4% will experience. Now, when talking about a percent this number seems so small however it's important to note that we're still talking about 2,800 properties in Fort Lauderdale. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see a good number of Fort Lauder residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 334 or 0.2% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Florida is about $600, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance cover damages to a dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Florida, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

The hurricane season is showing more of its damage everywhere in the country and how it can contribute to escalating flood damage for property owners. Today, let's talk about the upcoming changes to federal flood insurance for residents of the small city with a big heart, Milford, New Haven, Connecticut.

We've already talked about the overall changes to federal flood insurance rates and premiums for the state of Connecticut in our previous blog, so today we want to give more specifics to get why and how these changes came to be.

Flood Insurance Guru | Connecticut Flood Insurance: New Haven NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Connecticut had been through a rough patch recently due to tropical storm Elsa. All that rain caused flooding that took two weeks for some homeowners to bounce back from. A lot of people also didn't expect the amount of water that flooded them and damaged buildings. This instance is one of the proof that understanding the risk of flooding in your property is very crucial especially in a time where hurricane activity can bring devastating damages due to floods, strong winds, and sometimes even tornadoes.

A lot of participating communities will be seeing massive changes to rates for the good and the bad when it comes to rates, and these changes will be taking effect from none other than the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the new Risk Rating 2.0.

Risk Rating 2.0

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood map. What flood zone are you in?
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Type of floods that the property receives
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • First-floor height and elevation
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Milford City, Connecticut. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Flood Insurance Guru | Connecticut Flood Insurance: New Haven NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

Let's start by covering this update with the good stuff coming with the Risk Rating 2.0. These are good changes as generally, this means that homeowners get to protect their homes and properties through a decreased flood insurance rate from FEMA and the NFIP.

In total, 3,244 or 35.4% of the FEMA policies for Milford homeowners. They will get this immediate decrease in flood insurance rates once the Risk Rating 2.0 kicks in. It's important to note that 1,674 or 18.2% of the policies in force will be getting a decrease that ranges from $0 to $50 (up to $600 per year) and about 1,570 or 17.1% of the policies will be getting a decrease ranging from $50 to more than $100 ($600 - >$1200 per year).

This type of change can really help a lot of these people get protected from the damages of flood, specifically coastal flooding where even the largest building is also a part of the flood-prone homes. Considering that Connecticut also has the second most expensive rates and premiums on the national average, this type of decrease can make the national flood insurance more affordable for more people.

The Bad

Now that we've covered the good things, we have to move into more changes that many people won't like. Starting with the bad change which represents a slight increase in flood insurance rates for policyholders of the NFIP.

This bad change will impact the largest chunk out of Milford since about 4,476 or 48.8% will be getting the increase. This means that flood insurance rates will go up from $0 to $10 per month ($0 - $120 per year).

Now we've already mentioned that the state is already the second most expensive flood insurance in the United States and if you're talking about getting that premium to more than $1500, a lot of homeowners might find it hard to get flood insurance. We'd like to remind everyone however that this isn't the end and you can still go through the private market.

The Ugly

Now, let's move into the ugly changes. We divided this change into three different parts which we call the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest. Let's talk about them.

First, the ugly change will still be about an increase in rates with FEMA when it comes to flood insurance, but we turn the notch up a bit. This will impact about 685 or 7.5% of the homeowners with an NFIP policy and you'll start to see that the increase will now range from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year).

Next, the uglier change will impact 668 or 7.3% of the policies in Milford. The increase we're talking about will start at more than $10 up to $50 per month ($120 -$600 per year). As you can notice, we're starting to see a higher increase as we move further down the line which brings us to the ugliest change.

Lastly, the ugliest change will impact 102 or 1.1% of the policies in the city. This time around the increase in rates will be more drastic since we're talking about more than a hundred homeowners that will get an increase of $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Regardless of what FEMA and the NFIP pull on your flood risk or what we call the fingerprint of your flood risk when you're impacted by this change you can expect to face more than $1500 premium and some can even go to $3000 premium. 

Flood Insurance Guru | Connecticut Flood Insurance: New Haven NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Connecticut, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Milford City in Sussex County, Delaware.

Flood Insurance Guru | Delaware Flood Insurance: Milford NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In turn, the NFIP and FEMA make sure that you will get accurate flood insurance rates for your policy.

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Zone Designation in the flood insurance rate maps
  • Type of floods in the area. Is it from the coast? Is it pluvial or collected water from a storm?
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard determination, floodplain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • First-floor height and elevation of the structure.
  • Flood mitigation measures on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Milford, Sussex County. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Flood Insurance Guru | Delaware Flood Insurance: Milford NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to the residents of Milford.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 39.4% or 8,728 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 7,056 or 31.9% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 1,672 or 1.3% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 11,084 or 50.1% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Milford.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 1,906 or 8.6% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 383 or 1.8% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Milford residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 25 or 0.1% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average flood insurance rate across Delaware is about $750 according to Value Penguin, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Flood Insurance Guru | Delaware Flood Insurance: Milford NFIP Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Delaware, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Colorado is a state known for its diverse landscapes ranging from deserts to rivers and each presents flood risks to properties across the state. We've already covered the statewide increases and decreases in flood insurance premiums with the Risk Rating 2.0.

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Denver, Colorado.

Colorado Flood Insurance: Denver Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • Risk of flood in the area, the chance of flooding, and flood frequency
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Denver, Colorado. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Colorado Flood Insurance: Denver Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Denver.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 46.8% or 533 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 363 or 31.8% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 170 or 14.9% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 481 or 42.2% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Denver.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 36 or 3.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 69 or 6.1% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Denver residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 21 or 1.8% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Colorado is about $930, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

Colorado Flood Insurance: Denver Risk Rating 2.0 Update

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Los Angeles, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Colorado is a state known for its diverse landscapes ranging from deserts to rivers and each presents flood risks to properties across the state. We've already covered the statewide increases and decreases in flood insurance premiums with the Risk Rating 2.0.

Today, we dive deeper into more specific territories and discuss the changes coming with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Risk Rating 2.0 to Boulder, Colorado.

Colorado Flood Insurance: Boulder Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • Risk of flood in the area, the chance of flooding, and flood frequency
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let floodwaters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Boulder, Colorado. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

Colorado Flood Insurance: Boulder Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Boulder.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 46.8% or 533 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 363 or 31.8% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 170 or 14.9% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 481 or 42.2% of the policies in the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Boulder.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 36 or 3.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 69 or 6.1% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Boulder residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 21 or 1.8% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from floodwaters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across Colorado is about $930, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

Colorado Flood Insurance: Boulder Risk Rating 2.0 Update

NFIP

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000. There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Los Angeles, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

We've covered the gist of the upcoming changes to federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). As we dive deeper into the hurricane season and closer to the date of these updates, we want to prepare for what's to come to your community.

We've covered the changes happening in each state and today, we dive into more specific territories and talk about the changes coming to federal flood insurance in San Diego County, California.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: San Diego Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

For this new series of content, we will focus on the major cities in all major counties that are going to receive the bulk of the impact of the upcoming changes with flood insurance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), but first, let's refresh our memory and see why these changes are happening.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents.

FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: San Diego Risk Rating 2.0 Update

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

It's important to note however that the National Flood Insurance Program didn't have any major changes in the last thirty years until now which will be in the form of the Risk Rating 2.0.

What is the Risk Rating 2.0, you ask?

The Flood Insurance Guru | Huntsville, Alabama New Federal Flood Insurance Risk Rating 2.0

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • Risk of flood in the area, the chance of flooding, and flood frequency
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let flood waters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on San Diego, California. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: San Diego Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of America's Finest City, San Diego.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 26.7% or 2,428 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 1,616 or 17.7% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 812 or 8.9% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 5,664 or 62.2% of the policies in San Diego County and the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest chunk out of the population in San Diego.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 578 or 6.3% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 390 or 4.3% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few San Diego residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 48 or half a percent of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from flood waters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across California is about $850, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in San Diego County, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which let's us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

We've covered the gist of the upcoming changes to federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). As we dive deeper into the hurricane season and closer to the date of these updates, we want to prepare for what's to come to Sacramento.

We've covered the changes happening in each state and today, we dive into more specific territories and talk about the changes coming to federal flood insurance in Sacramento City, California.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Sacramento Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

For this new series of content, we will focus on the major cities in all major counties that are going to receive the bulk of the impact of the upcoming changes with flood insurance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), but first, let's refresh our memory and see why these changes are happening.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance. So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Sacramento Risk Rating 2.0 Update

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

It's important to note however that the National Flood Insurance Program didn't have any major changes in the last thirty years until now which will be in the form of the Risk Rating 2.0.

What is the Risk Rating 2.0, you ask?

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Sacramento Risk Rating 2.0 Update

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • Risk of flood in the area, the chance of flooding, and flood frequency
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let flood waters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Madison County and its seat, Huntsville City. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Sacramento Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of the Big Tomato, Sacramento.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 28.8% or 15,143 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 12,853 or 24.5% of the policies in Sacramento will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 2,290 or 4.4% of the national flood insurance policies in force. This means that about 4.4% of the populous in Sacramento will get an immediate decrease that from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 37,162 or 70.8% of the policies in Sacramento. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest chunk out of the population in Sacramento.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 109 or 0.2% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 70 or 0.1% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Sacramento residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 7 policies that FEMA has in force in Sacramento. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to $60 per month ($600 to $720 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from flood waters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across California is about $850, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to move to another insurer.

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes.

The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Sacramento, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which lets us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

We've covered the gist of the upcoming changes to federal flood insurance under the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). As we dive deeper into the hurricane season and closer to the date of these updates, we want to prepare for what's to come to your community.

We've covered the changes happening in each state and today, we dive into more specific territories and talk about the changes coming to federal flood insurance in the City of Angels, Los Angeles, California.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Los Angeles Risk Rating 2.0 Update

For this new series of content, we will focus on the major cities in all major counties that are going to receive the bulk of the impact of the upcoming changes with flood insurance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), but first, let's refresh our memory and see why these changes are happening.

It's important to note however that the National Flood Insurance Program didn't have any major changes in the last thirty years until now which will be in the form of the Risk Rating 2.0.

What is the Risk Rating 2.0, you ask?

Risk Rating 2.0: What Changes?

This is what FEMA calls equity in action when it comes to making the cost of flood insurance policies fairer per policyholder. This simply means that when it comes to flood insurance rates, a lot of things will start to change with the NFIP and FEMA. Generally, this is because property values for each individual property will be accounted for when finalizing your quote and flood insurance premiums with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It's important to note, however, that this won't mean that the cheapest flood insurance will go automatically to lower-valued homes. It's equally important that we take into account, just like FEMA does and the private flood insurance industry, what's called flood risk variables which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Designation in the flood zone maps.
  • History of flood incidents, flood damage, and flood loss
  • Flood claims made with the property
  • Flood hazard, flood plain devolvement, and impact of flooding
  • Risk of flood in the area, the chance of flooding, and flood frequency
  • Mitigation efforts made on the property. Is the lowest floor above the base flood elevation? Are there enough flood openings to let flood waters through?

Now that we've covered the NFIP and the Risk Rating 2.0, let's talk about its impact on Los Angeles County. We'll cover the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to the residents of the city.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Los Angeles Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The Good

When we're talking about these changes, we want to emphasize that this will solely involve flood premiums changes or updates from FEMA and the NFIP. Let's kick this off with the good changes coming to residents of Los Angeles County.

The good changes will involve an immediate decrease in flood premiums with FEMA. This decrease can go up to more than $100 (>$1200 per year) and will impact 20.7% or 3,652 National Flood Insurance policies in force in the city. We divide these changes into two parts.

The first covers the decrease in flood insurance rates or premiums that ranges from $0 to $50 per month (up to $600 per year). About 1,858 or 10.5% of the policies will be impacted by this change.

On the other hand, you have a better deal with the second part of this good change since it generally covers 1,794 or 10.2% of the national flood insurance policies in force. The immediate decrease ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 - >$1200 per year).

Considering that the national average when it comes to premiums is about $1000 across the United States, this can really help a lot of people get flood insurance through FEMA especially when we're talking about coastal zones where flood risks can be extremely high and get the bulk of the damages from natural disasters.

The Bad

If there are good changes, there are also bad ones. This change from the Risk Rating 2.0 will get increase your flood insurance costs when it comes to FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The increase will range from $0 to $10 per month (up to $120 per year) and will impact about 11,329 or 64.1% of the policies in Los Angeles County and the city itself. Now, this increase may seem so small, but you have to consider that this takes the biggest percent out of the population in Los Angeles.

Now that we're facing increased climate risks, it's hard to ignore that the risk of flooding in areas that sit near the coastline is safe from the damage from floods.

The Ugly

Now, let's move deeper and into the ugly changes. For this part, we want to emphasize that we divided this into three parts: the ugly, the uglier, and the ugliest change. Let's dive into specifics.

First, the ugly change will be covering about 1,543 or 8.7% of the policies. The reason why this falls under the ugly change is that the increase is now noticeable since it ranges from $10 to $20 per month ($120 to $240 per year). 

On the other hand, you have the uglier change which is something that about 1,043 or 5.9% will experience. This time around, the increase won't be bearable since it ranges from $20 to $50 per month ($240 to $600 per year).

Lastly, you can also see few Los Angeles residents fall on the ugliest side. This mostly involves about 107 or 0.6% of properties in the city. Although it's a very small number of people, you have to realize that the increase ranges from $50 to more than $100 per month ($600 to >$1200 per year in annual premium).

This can really make it difficult to go into federal flood insurance and even a harder experience if the private flood insurance market is not available to protect you from flood waters. Regardless of where you fall on these three, considering that the average premium across California is about $850, this type of increase can really hurt your budget and we won't even blame you if you want to get private policies.

The Flood Insurance Guru | California Flood Insurance: Los Angeles Risk Rating 2.0 Update

The National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is the answer of the federal government when it comes to flood concerns. This program was established ever since 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is currently working as the federal or government agencies' flood insurance for the United States and its residents. FEMA and NFIP always look into analyzing and studying floodplain devolvement, flood model management, flood insurance, and disaster assistance.

So, what does the NFIP cover?

First, it's important to keep in mind that flood insurance is a separate policy from your usual homeowner's insurance and auto insurance policies. This means that if your house gets inundated during a flood event, it won't be the homeowner's policy that will give you flood coverage.

Now that we got that out of the way, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides coverages for the flood damage that your property will sustain. The property will involve both the dwelling or the building itself — either residential property or commercial — as well as the contents or the personal property that's inside the insured home. NFIP flood insurance will provide coverage for the dwelling that maxes to $250,000 and contents that maxes to $100,000.

There's also additional coverage that comes in when you're a participating community in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which can be enjoyed through the Community Rating System (CRS) and the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC).

When Will It Happen?

The Risk Rating 2.0 from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will take effect starting this October 1st, 2021. It's important to note however that you really don't need to immediately adopt these new rates once Fall comes. The NFIP will allow you to adopt these new rates on your renewal, so if you just renewed your policy with FEMA last April then you can move into the new rates in April 2022.

At the end of the day, we're still subject to extreme weather events, and our friends in coastal areas are more prone to the dangers of these disasters. It's best to know where to get a policy best because we've seen that even without floods, a lot of people still drown due to these expensive insurance premiums.

Get a quote from the Flood Insurance Guru!

If you have questions on your flood insurance options in Los Angeles, your flood risk score, or anything about flood, reach out to us by clicking below. Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation which let's us help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Get Your Flood Risk Score Here!