Risk Rating 2.0 is a new tool developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to determine whether communities are at risk from flooding.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Walworth, Wisconsin

This tool uses a combination of data sources to identify areas where flooding is likely to occur and the same data will also be the basis for your premium rate.

One of the biggest things that this new rating system won't take into account when it comes to premium rates is flood zones. How will this impact these new flood map updates?

Walworth, Wisconsin

Walworth, Wisconsin experienced significant flooding in 2018 and 2019. The floods were caused by a combination of heavy rains and melting snow. The 2018 floods damaged homes, businesses, and infrastructure, and forced many residents to evacuate.

The 2019 floods were even more destructive, causing nearly $2 billion in damage and resulting in the death of one person. In response to the floods, the State of Wisconsin has implemented a number of flood mitigation measures. These measures include constructing levees and floodwalls, dredging rivers and streams, and creating wetlands.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Walworth, Wisconsin

However, it is unclear whether these measures will be sufficient to protect against future floods. In 2022, Wisconsin experienced another series of devastating floods. These floods caused $4.5 billion in damage and resulted in the death

This type of history with flooding is only bound to expect to see major flood map changes. Today, we want to talk about the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly changes coming to flood maps of Walworth County, Wisconsin this April 6th, 2022.

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for 151 property owners impacted by this movement in Walworth County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA). This is a significant number because generally, we see fewer properties moving out from a high-risk zone whenever there are new flood insurance rate maps.

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact only 75 properties in Walworth, Wisconsin. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation.

Being part of this change can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one.

Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 2,063 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates increase significantly.

Now, let's talk about your flood insurance options in Walworth County. Watch the video below to know the difference between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Private Flood Insurance market.

Flood insurance is important now more than ever as we face higher risks for floods. You don't want to be blindsided by all that floodwater and find yourself in a lot of losses.

If you want to learn more about flood insurance in Wisconsin, flood mitigation, or anything related to flood insurance, click below to go to our Flood Learning Center:

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

You can also click below to call us:

a person wearing a hat

Risk Rating 2.0 is a new tool developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to determine whether communities are at risk from flooding.

This tool uses a combination of data sources to identify areas where flooding is likely to occur and the same data will also be the basis for your premium rate.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Surry County, Virginia

One of the biggest things that this new rating system won't take into account when it comes to premium rates is flood zones. However, it is still important to be aware of new flood maps updates as this represents both where flooding can happen and where flood insurance is required.

Surry County

Surry County, Virginia has a long history of flooding. The county is located in the southeastern part of the state, on the Virginia-North Carolina border. The county is home to the Great Dismal Swamp, which is a large wetland that is prone to flooding. The area has also been hit by several hurricanes over the years, which have caused significant flooding.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Surry County, Virginia

In recent years, Surry County has been hit by two major floods: one in 2003 and one in 2016. Both of these floods caused significant damage to homes and businesses in the county.

This type of history with flooding is only bound to expect to see major flood map changes. Today, we want to talk about the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly changes coming to flood maps of Surry County, Virginia this April 6th, 2022.

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for only 31 property owners impacted by this movement in Surry County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 293 properties in Surry County, Virginia. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation.

Being part of this change can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one.

Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 968 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates increase significantly.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Surry County, Virginia

Now, let's talk about your flood insurance options in Surry County. Watch the video below to know the difference between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Private Flood Insurance market.

Flood insurance is important now more than ever as we face higher risks for floods. You don't want to be blindsided by all that floodwater and find yourself in a lot of losses.

If you want to learn more about flood insurance in Virginia, flood mitigation, or anything related to flood insurance, click below to go to our Flood Learning Center:

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

You can also click below to call us:

a person wearing a hat

Risk Rating 2.0 is a new tool developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to determine whether communities are at risk from flooding.

April 2022 Flood Map Update: Harney, Oregon

This tool uses a combination of data sources to identify areas where flooding is likely to occur and the same data will also be the basis for your premium rate.

One of the biggest things that this new rating system won't take into account when it comes to premium rates is flood zones. However, it is still important to be aware of new flood maps updates as this represents both where flooding can happen and where flood insurance is required.

Harney, Oregon

Oregon may not be the first place that comes to mind when you think of floods, but the state has a long and storied history with this natural disaster. From the massive flood of 1862 that destroyed much of downtown Portland to the devastating floods that have struck in recent years, Oregonians know all too well how destructive flooding can be.

April 2022 Flood Map Update: Harney, Oregon

If you're concerned about your home's risk of flooding, it's important to understand your area's history and what steps you can take to protect your property.

Today, we want to talk about the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly changes coming to flood maps of Harney County, Oregon this April 20th, 2022.

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for 486 property owners impacted by this movement in Harney County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA). This is somewhat unexpected because generally, we see fewer properties moving out from a high-risk zone whenever there are new flood insurance rate maps.

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact only 320 properties in Harney, Oregon. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation.

Being part of this change can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one.

Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 3,052 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates increase significantly.

April 2022 Flood Map Update: Harney, Oregon

Now, let's talk about your flood insurance options in Harney County. Watch the video below to know the difference between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Private Flood Insurance market.

Flood insurance is important now more than ever as we face higher risks for floods. You don't want to be blindsided by all that floodwater and find yourself in a lot of losses.

If you want to learn more about flood insurance in Oregon, flood mitigation, or anything related to flood insurance, click below to go to our Flood Learning Center:

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

You can also click below to call us:

a person wearing a hat

Risk Rating 2.0 is a new tool developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to determine whether communities are at risk from flooding.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Charles City, Virginia

This tool uses a combination of data sources to identify areas where flooding is likely to occur and the same data will also be the basis for your premium rate.

One of the biggest things that this new rating system won't take into account when it comes to premium rates is flood zones. However, it is still important to be aware of new flood maps updates as this represents both where flooding can happen and where flood insurance is required.

Charles City, Virginia

Floods in Charles City Virginia are a common occurrence. The city is situated on the banks of the James River, which is prone to flooding. In recent years, the city has experienced several floods, including one in 2018 that caused significant damage to homes and businesses.

flooding can occur at any time of year but is most common during the spring and summer months when the river is swollen from melting snow and heavy rains. Flooding can also occur during hurricanes and other severe weather events.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Charles City, Virginia

When floods do occur, they can cause extensive damage to property and infrastructure. In some cases, people have had to be evacuated from their homes. If you live in or around Charles City, it's important to be prepared for floods.

Today, we want to talk about the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly changes coming to flood maps of Charles City County, Virginia this April 20th, 2022.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Charles City, Virginia

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for only 14 property owners impacted by this movement in Charles City County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact only 430 properties in Charles City, Virginia. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation.

Being part of this change can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one.

Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 648 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates increase significantly.

Now, let's talk about your flood insurance options in Charles City County. Watch the video below to know the difference between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Private Flood Insurance market.

Flood insurance is important now more than ever as we face higher risks for floods. You don't want to be blindsided by all that floodwater and find yourself in a lot of losses.

If you want to learn more about flood insurance in Virginia, flood mitigation, or anything related to flood insurance, click below to go to our Flood Learning Center:

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

You can also click below to call us:

a person wearing a hat

We're officially doing Risk Rating 2.0 across the board. In case you missed it, this new program for the NFIP will no longer look at flood zones as a basis for flood policies' premium rates.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates: Rice County, Minnesota

However, flood zones still have a firm grip on how flood insurance functions and one of the things that will be staying. Despite not being a factor that impacts rates, flood zones still will still call shots on whether or not a property is required to carry flood insurance.

Let's talk about the flood map changes that recently came to Rice County in the Land of 10,000 Lakes.

Rice County Flood Maps

Minnesota's Rice County just got new flood maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in order to reflect the county's current flood risk.

The state itself is no stranger to flooding, especially during this season as we transition from the cold snowy winter to the warmer blooming spring. As this presents increased flood risks, we look at how floodplain management regulations and flood maps react to this type of change.

Flood Map Updates

In this article, we'll look at the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to Rice County in Minnesota. Even though flood zones no longer matter rates-wise, it's important we still look at these to see to understand where flood insurance might be required for almost 2,600 properties that are affected.

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for only 12 property owners impacted by this movement in Rice County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 17 properties in Rice County,  Minnesota. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

 

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation.

Being part of this change can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one.

Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 377 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates increase significantly.

 

Now, let's talk about your flood insurance options in Rice County. Watch the video below to know the difference between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and the Private Flood Insurance market.

Flood insurance is important now more than ever as we face higher risks for floods. You don't want to be blindsided by all that floodwater and find yourself in a lot of losses.

If you want to learn more about flood insurance in Minnesota, flood mitigation, or anything related to flood insurance, click below to go to our Flood Learning Center:

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

You can also click below to call us:

The Flood Insurance Guru | 2054514294

As we got past April 1st, we officially move out of using flood zones as a means of rating flood insurance. However, these zones still have a grip on flood insurance concerns.

With 16 new maps to be added to the county, let's look at the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to Gilpin County, Colorado with this new flood map update that's coming on April 6th, 2022.

Flood Map Changes

When it comes to flood map updates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), this generally shows you three separate changes which we'd call the good, the bad, and the ugly changes.

So, what are these changes coming to almost 10,000 properties in Gilpin County, and how do they impact your flood insurance?

April 2022 Flood Map Updates for Gilpin County, Colorado

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like Flood Zone X.

This is a good thing for about 171 properties owners are impacted by this movement in Gilpin County. This simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, it's still a bad idea to not have flood insurance.

Yes! This is especially true if you're in a low-risk flood zone. Mostly, this is due to the fact that even Flood Zone X gets flooded and sometimes they get flood damage that is substantially worse than those in coastal zones or SFHA. FEMA even reports that at least 25% of flood claims come from low-risk zones.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 368 properties in Gilpin County,  Ohio.

Unlike the good change, this means that if you're one of the 368 properties, you'll be getting moved into a high-risk flood zone. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

It's out of Flood Zone X and into Flood Zone A this time around.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation. So floodplain administrators don't really know where and how flooding can start.

Putting two and two together, these areas are generally experiencing more unpredictable flood behavior and as a property owner, your chance of flooding can't really be pinned down easily.

Despite not being a basis for flood insurance premiums anymore, if you don't install the necessary flood prevention or mitigation measures, this can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one. Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 671 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update.

Equally, "in to in" may also indicate properties that are in Flood Zone X will stay in this low-risk flood zone; however if you're in the SFHA, this might also mean that you're being mapped deeper into it. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates skyrocket.

Being in flood zone A is already a bad thing, but this can become ugly if you move into a Flood Zone AE because generally, this type of high-risk area in the SFHA indicates that the base flood elevation has been determined.

Now, that you know these changes, it's best to also know your flood insurance options in Gilpin County especially if you're one of the property owners that are being moved into or are staying in the SFHA where flood insurance is required.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates for Gilpin County, Colorado

NFIP

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is purely managed by the federal government since this is FEMA's answer to flood insurance. An NFIP flood policy can get you flood coverage on both your dwelling and the contents within it.

There is a coverage limit when it comes to federal flood policies. Flood damage to buildings will be covered to a maximum of $250,000 for residential policies and can only go up to $500,000 maximum if it's for a commercial property.

Regardless of the type of property you have written, you can expect to get a $100,000 maximum contents coverage from an NFIP policy.

April 2022 Flood Map Updates for Gilpin County, Colorado

There's also what's called the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage. This is a $30,000 additional coverage for your property in order to make sure that there are flood mitigation efforts made on the property.

Generally, this can include sandbagging your property, installing floodproofing walls, raising your lowest floor from the base flood elevation levels, and putting flood openings. The labor that goes into making these mitigation efforts happen will also be covered under the ICC.

There are also perks to a participating community in Gilpin County. A participating community gets access to federal flood insurance and disaster assistance, but more importantly, you also get to work with your community on raising your Community Rating System (CRS) score.

The CRS measures and rewards the overall flood mitigation efforts done by the community according to FEMA's standards on floodplain management. Simply put, the higher your CRS score is, the bigger the flood insurance discount you'll get from FEMA and the NFIP.

You can start enjoying your NFIP policy after a 30-day waiting period from the flood insurance purchase.

If the federal flood insurance option doesn't really work for you then you can manage this new floodplain mapping through the private flood insurance market.

Private Flood Insurance

It's important to note that this market will solely be managed and provided by private insurance companies which generally means that the red tapes FEMA and NFIP has to go through won't be there.

The first thing you'll immediately see with the private flood market is that there are significantly shorter waiting periods for your flood policy. Once you have everything settled and paid for, the waiting period for the private flood carriers will follow a much shorter timeframe compared to NFIP. A private flood insurance policy can take effect for 3 or up to 15 days maximum.

Another good thing coming out of private flood insurance is that there are no coverage limits. This means that you won't really need to stress over how to get covered for a $500,000 home since it will be fully covered by your policy.

This is the same with contents coverage and you'll also get additional coverages like replacement costsadditional living expenses, and loss of use.

At the end of the day, the choice of where you'll be getting flood insurance depends on you. What's really important is that you know your flood risks and have enough protection from all possible outcomes of a flood event such as flood loss and flood damage.

Click the link below to access our Flood Learning Center where we try to answer your questions on flood insurance and beyond.

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

Flood Map Updates: Anderson County, Kansas

It's been a long time coming, but Anderson County in Kansas will be getting its flood maps updated this March.

In this blog, we talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to Anderson County, Kansas with this new flood map update coming that came on March 8th. 30 maps are being changed in the county to reflect its risks for flooding. Let's see how this can still impact your flood insurance since rates are no longer impacted.

Flood Map Changes

Flood insurance rate maps (FIRMs) are constantly updated in order to reflect the current floodplain devolvement and changes to a certain area. Now, you may get a new flood map every other month or sometimes it can take up to years. Simply being "in the know" when it comes to these changes can really help you manage the ever-changing landscape of the flood insurance industry.

Now, when it comes to flood map updates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), this generally shows you three separate changes which we'd call the good, the bad, and the ugly changes. Why did we call it this way, well you will have to know for yourself at the latter part of this blog.

So, what are these changes coming to almost 7,500 properties in Anderson County, and how do they impact your flood insurance?

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". This is a beneficial change for about 129 properties owners are impacted by this movement in Anderson County. Generally, this simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like a Flood Zone X.

Although flood insurance doesn't consider flood zones when it comes to premium rates anymore, this type of movement still holds good news for property owners. This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, we highly discourage removing flood insurance for your property.

Yes! This is especially true if you're in a low-risk flood zone. Mostly, this is due to the fact that even Flood Zone X gets flooded and sometimes they get flood damage that is substantially worse than those in coastal zones or SFHA.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 218 properties.

Unlike the good change, this means that if you're one of the 218 properties, you'll be getting moved into a high-risk flood zone. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

It's out of the Flood Zone X and in Flood Zone A this time around.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation. So floodplain administrators don't really know where and how flooding can start.

Putting two and two together, these areas are generally experiencing more unpredictable flood behavior and as a property owner, your chance of flooding can't really be pinned down easily.

Despite not being a basis for flood insurance premiums anymore, if you don't install the necessary flood prevention or mitigation measures, this can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one. Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 2,141 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update.

Equally, "in to in" may also indicate properties that are in Flood Zone X will stay in this low-risk flood zone; however if you're in the SFHA, this might also mean that you're being mapped deeper into it. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates skyrocket.

Now, that you know these changes, it's best to also know your flood insurance options in Anderson County.

Flood Map Updates Greene County, Ohio

Federal Flood Insurance

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is purely managed by the federal government since this is FEMA's answer to flood insurance. An NFIP flood policy can get you flood coverage on both your dwelling and the contents within it.

When we say dwelling, this simply pertains to either the residential property or commercial building that you're trying to insure with NFIP and FEMA; contents will be more about the personal property and items you have inside the insured building.

Flood Map Updates Greene County, Ohio

There is a coverage limit when it comes to federal flood policies. Flood damage to buildings will be covered to a maximum of $250,000 for residential policies and can only go up to $500,000 maximum if it's for a commercial property.

Regardless of the type of property you have written, you can expect to get a $100,000 maximum contents coverage from an NFIP policy. There's also an additional coverage from FEMA and the NFIP called the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage.

There are also perks with your participating community in Anderson County. A participating community gets access to federal flood insurance and disaster assistance, but more importantly, you also get to work with your community on raising your Community Rating System (CRS) score.

The CRS measures and rewards the overall flood mitigation efforts done by the community according to FEMA's standards on floodplain management. Simply put, the higher your CRS score is, the bigger the flood insurance discount you'll get from FEMA and the NFIP.

You can start enjoying your NFIP policy after a 30-day waiting period from the flood insurance purchase.

Private Flood Insurance

If the federal flood insurance option doesn't really work for you then you can manage this new floodplain mapping through the private flood insurance market. It's important to note that this market will solely be managed and provided by private insurance companies which generally means that the red tapes FEMA and NFIP has to go through won't be there.

 

The first thing you'll immediately see with the private flood market is that there are significantly shorter waiting periods for your flood policy. Once you have everything settled and paid for, the waiting period for the private flood carriers will follow a much shorter timeframe compared to NFIP. A private flood insurance policy can take effect on 3 or up to 15 days maximum

Another good thing coming out of private flood insurance is that there are no coverage limits. This means that you won't really need to stress over how to get covered for a $500,000 home since it will be fully covered by your policy. This is the same with contents coverage and you'll also get additional coverages like replacement costsadditional living expenses, and loss of use.

At the end of the day, the choice of where you'll be getting flood insurance depends on you. What's really important is that you know your flood risks and have enough protection from all possible outcomes of a flood event such as flood loss and flood damage.

Click the link below to access our Flood Learning Center where we try to answer your questions on flood insurance and beyond.

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation and we want to help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Despite no longer using flood zones as a basis for flood insurance rates across the country, flood map updates still have a firm grip over flood insurance. 

In this video, we talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to Greene County, Ohio with this new flood map update coming that came on March 8th. With 47 new maps to be added to the county, let's see how this can still impact your flood insurance since rates are no longer impacted.

Flood Map Changes

Flood insurance rate maps (FIRMs) are constantly updated in order to reflect the current floodplain devolvement and changes to a certain area. Now, you may get a new flood map every other month or sometimes it can take up to years. Simply being "in the know" when it comes to these changes can really help you manage the ever-changing landscape of the flood insurance industry.

Now, when it comes to flood map updates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), this generally shows you three separate changes which we'd call the good, the bad, and the ugly changes. Why did we call it this way, well you will have to know for yourself at the latter part of this blog.

So, what are these changes coming to almost 63000 properties in Greene County, and how do they impact your flood insurance?

Flood Map Updates Greene County, Ohio

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". This is a beneficial change for about 374 properties owners are impacted by this movement in Greene County. Generally, this simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like a Flood Zone X.

Although flood insurance doesn't consider flood zones when it comes to premium rates anymore, this type of movement still holds good news for property owners. This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, we highly discourage removing flood insurance for your property.

Yes! This is especially true if you're in a low-risk flood zone. Mostly, this is due to the fact that even Flood Zone X gets flooded and sometimes they get flood damage that is substantially worse than those in coastal zones or SFHA.

 

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 287 properties.

Unlike the good change, this means that if you're one of the 287 properties, you'll be getting moved into a high-risk flood zone. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

It's out of the Flood Zone X and in Flood Zone A this time around.

Although this doesn't really impact premium rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation. So floodplain administrators don't really know where and how flooding can start.

Putting two and two together, these areas are generally experiencing more unpredictable flood behavior and as a property owner, your chance of flooding can't really be pinned down easily.

Despite not being a basis for flood insurance premiums anymore, if you don't install the necessary flood prevention or mitigation measures, this can still hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one. Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for the county. At least 4,329 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update.

Equally, "in to in" may also indicate properties that are in Flood Zone X will stay in this low-risk flood zone; however if you're in the SFHA, this might also mean that you're being mapped deeper into it. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

Being in a flood zone A is already a bad thing, but this can become ugly if you move into a Flood Zone AE because generally, this type of high-risk area in the SFHA indicates that the base flood elevation has been determined.

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates skyrocket.

Now, that you know these changes, it's best to also know your flood insurance options in Greene County especially if you're one of the property owners that are being moved into or are staying in the SFHA where flood insurance is required.

Flood Map Updates Greene County, Ohio

Federal Flood Insurance

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is purely managed by the federal government since this is FEMA's answer to flood insurance. An NFIP flood policy can get you flood coverage on both your dwelling and the contents within it.

When we say dwelling, this simply pertains to either the residential property or commercial building that you're trying to insure with NFIP and FEMA; contents will be more about the personal property and items you have inside the insured building.

Flood Map Updates Greene County, Ohio

There is a coverage limit when it comes to federal flood policies. Flood damage to buildings will be covered to a maximum of $250,000 for residential policies and can only go up to $500,000 maximum if it's for a commercial property. Regardless of the type of property you have written, you can expect to get a $100,000 maximum contents coverage from an NFIP policy.

There's also what's called the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage. This is a $30,000 additional coverage for your property in order to make sure that there are flood mitigation efforts made on the property according to the federal government's standards.

Generally, this can include sandbagging your property, installing floodproofing walls, raising your lowest floor from the base flood elevation levels, and putting flood openings. The labor that goes into making these mitigation efforts happen will also be covered under the ICC.

There are also perks with your participating community in Greene County. A participating community gets access to federal flood insurance and disaster assistance, but more importantly, you also get to work with your community on raising your Community Rating System (CRS) score.

The CRS measures and rewards the overall flood mitigation efforts done by the community according to FEMA's standards on floodplain management. Simply put, the higher your CRS score is, the bigger the flood insurance discount you'll get from FEMA and the NFIP.

You can start enjoying your NFIP policy after a 30-day waiting period from the flood insurance purchase.

Private Flood Insurance

If the federal flood insurance option doesn't really work for you then you can manage this new floodplain mapping through the private flood insurance market. It's important to note that this market will solely be managed and provided by private insurance companies which generally means that the red tapes FEMA and NFIP has to go through won't be there.

The first thing you'll immediately see with the private flood market is that there are significantly shorter waiting periods for your flood policy. Once you have everything settled and paid for, the waiting period for the private flood carriers will follow a much shorter timeframe compared to NFIP. A private flood insurance policy can take effect on 3 or up to 15 days maximum

Another good thing coming out of private flood insurance is that there are no coverage limits. This means that you won't really need to stress over how to get covered for a $500,000 home since it will be fully covered by your policy. This is the same with contents coverage and you'll also get additional coverages like replacement costsadditional living expenses, and loss of use.

At the end of the day, the choice of where you'll be getting flood insurance depends on you. What's really important is that you know your flood risks and have enough protection from all possible outcomes of a flood event such as flood loss and flood damage.

Click the link below to access our Flood Learning Center where we try to answer your questions on flood insurance and beyond.

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation and we want to help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term.

Despite no longer using flood zones as a basis for flood insurance rates across the country, flood map updates still have a firm grip over flood insurance. 

In this video, we talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly changes coming to Washington County, Wisconsin with this new flood map update; in fact, it happened on February 25th, 2022.

 

Changing Flood Maps

Flood insurance rate maps (FIRMs) are constantly updated in order to reflect the current floodplain devolvement and changes to a certain area. Now, you may get a new flood map every other month or sometimes it can take up to years. Simply being "in the know" when it comes to these changes can really help you manage the ever-changing landscape of the flood insurance industry.

Now, when it comes to flood map updates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), this generally shows you three separate changes: "in to out movement", "out to in movement", and "in to in movement".

So, what are these changes coming to more than 14,000 properties in Washington County, and how do they impact your flood insurance?

The Good

When it comes to the good changes in flood map updates, this generally falls into the "in to out movement". This is a beneficial change for about 179 properties owners impacted by this movement in Washington County. Generally, this simply means that your property is being removed from the special flood hazard area (SFHA).

It's called this way because a property that's in a high-risk flood zone will be moved out to a low-risk flood zone like a Flood Zone X. Although flood insurance doesn't consider flood zones when it comes to premium rates anymore, this type of movement still holds good news for property owners.

Washington County, Wisconsin Flood Map Updates

Being moved into a lower-risk flood zone or Flood Zone X when you're previously in a high-risk zone indicates that your property is now facing less risk of flooding. This also means that due to the lower risks, your mortgage company will no longer require you to carry flood insurance on your property.

Although we'd love to tell you to cancel that policy, get your refund, and save more money by removing flood insurance from your expenses, we highly discourage removing flood insurance for your property. Yes! This is especially true if you're in a low-risk flood zone. Mostly, due to the fact that even Flood Zone X gets flooded and sometimes they get flood damage that is substantially worse than those in coastal zones or SFHA.

The Bad

Now, let's move into the bad changes which are coming in form of the aforementioned "out to in movement". This change is expected to impact about 344 properties in Washington County.

In a direct opposite of the good change, this means that if you're one of the properties, you'll be getting moved from outside the SFHA or a low-risk flood zone, and into a high-risk flood zone. Think of it as getting mapped to a Flood Zone A when you were previously in a Flood Zone X.

Again, although this doesn't really impact flood insurance rates directly, it's important to note that Flood Zone A generally means that the area doesn't have a base flood elevation. So floodplain administrators don't really know where and how flooding can start hence you're facing a higher risk than before.

If you don't install the necessary flood prevention or mitigation measures, this will only hurt your premium rates regardless of whether you're doing a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policy or a private flood insurance one. Properties in Flood Zone A, SFHA, or any high-risk zone are also required to carry flood insurance always.

The Ugly

Lastly, we have the ugly change or "in to in movement" which covers the largest impact on this flood map update for Washington County, Wisconsin. This is due to the fact that about 2,420 properties will retain their flood zone. This means that if you're in Flood Zone AE, you will stay there until the next flood map update.

Equally, "in to in" may also indicate properties that are in Flood Zone X will stay in this low-risk flood zone; however if you're in the SFHA, this might also mean that you're being mapped deeper into it. Think of it as moving from a Flood Zone A to a Flood Zone AE

If you're staying in your flood zone this means that you will also retain the same flood insurance rates since your risks also stay the same. On the other hand, if you fall into being moved deeper into the SFHA, which indicates that you're facing a higher risk for flooding, you will also see your premium rates skyrocket.

Being in a flood zone A is already a bad thing, but this can become ugly if you move into a Flood Zone AE because generally, this type of high-risk area in the SFHA indicates that the base flood elevation has been determined.

Washington County, Wisconsin Flood Map Updates

Now, that you know these changes, it's best to also know your flood insurance options in Washington County especially if you're one of the property owners that are being moved into or are staying in the SFHA where flood insurance is required.

Washington County, Wisconsin Flood Map Updates

The NFIP

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is purely managed by the federal government since this is FEMA's answer to flood insurance. An NFIP flood policy can get you flood coverage on both your dwelling and the contents within it.

When we say dwelling, this simply pertains to either the residential property or commercial building that you're trying to insure with NFIP and FEMA; contents will be more about the personal property and items you have inside the insured building.

Washington County, Wisconsin Flood Map Updates

There is a coverage limit when it comes to federal flood policies. Flood damage to buildings will be covered to a maximum of $250,000 for residential policies and can only go up to $500,000 maximum if it's for a commercial property. Regardless of the type of property you have written, you can expect to get a $100,000 maximum contents coverage from an NFIP policy.

There's also what's called the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage. This is a $30,000 additional coverage for your property in order to make sure that there are flood mitigation efforts made on the property according to the federal government's standards.

Generally, this can include sandbagging your property, installing floodproofing walls, raising your lowest floor from the base flood elevation levels, and putting flood openings. The labor that goes into making these mitigation efforts happen will also be covered under the ICC.

There are also perks with your participating community in Washington County. A participating community gets access to federal flood insurance and disaster assistance, but more importantly, you also get to work with your community on raising your Community Rating System (CRS) score.

The CRS measures and rewards the overall flood mitigation efforts done by the community according to FEMA's standards on floodplain management. Simply put, the higher your CRS score is, the bigger the flood insurance discount you'll get from FEMA and the NFIP.

You can start enjoying your NFIP policy after a 30-day waiting period from the flood insurance purchase.

The Private Flood

If the federal flood insurance option doesn't really work for you then you can manage this new floodplain mapping through the private flood insurance market. It's important to note that this market will solely be managed and provided by private insurance companies which generally means that the red tapes FEMA and NFIP has to go through won't be there.

The first thing you'll immediately see with the private flood market is that there are significantly shorter waiting periods for your flood policy. Once you have everything settled and paid for, the waiting period for the private flood carriers will follow a much shorter timeframe compared to NFIP. A private flood insurance policy can take effect on 3 or up to 15 days maximum

Washington County, Wisconsin Flood Map Updates

Another good thing coming out of private flood insurance is that there are no coverage limits. This means that you won't really need to stress over how to get covered for a $500,000 home since it will be fully covered by your policy. This is the same with contents coverage and you'll also get additional coverages like replacement costsadditional living expenses, and loss of use.

Fair warning, it's a known issue in the private insurance market in general that they will do moratoriums when there are risks that are too high for their comforts.

This simply means that they will either put a stop or take a break from providing flood insurance policies to a certain area that has higher risks. There's also a chance that you might not get to buy flood insurance from them once they decide to non-renew your policy.

At the end of the day, the choice of where you'll be getting flood insurance depends on you. What's really important is that you know your flood risks and have enough protection from all possible outcomes of a flood event such as flood loss and flood damage.

Click the link below to access our Flood Learning Center where we try to answer your questions on flood insurance and beyond.

Flood Insurance Guru | Service | Knowledge Base

Remember, we have an educational background in flood mitigation and we want to help you understand flood risks, your flood insurance, and mitigating your property long-term. 

Today we are discussing the recent flood insurance rate map updates for Marion county Mississippi. We want to discuss the history of flooding in Marion county, why the flood insurance map changes, type of flood zones in Marion county and who will be impacted.

 

Marion county has experienced a history of flooding especially the city of Columbia because of its location along the Pearl river. The major flooding threat for Marion county comes from flash flooding.

We have seen flooding events impact this area in 1938, 1961, 1974, 1979, 1983, 1999, and 2007.

The last flood insurance rate map update for Marion county was in 2011.

So why the update now?

Well this recent flood study showed that the Pearl river impacts more than 75% of the county.

 

There are three main flood zones in Marion county we want to discuss those zones so we can get a better understanding of who will be impacted. Those flood zones are

  1. Flood zone X
  2. Flood zone A
  3. Flood zone AE

Flood zone X is considered a low risk zone. Flood insurance in this area is not mandatory. The flooding that generally occurs in this area is from flash flooding. Its important to understand this since flash flooding is the main threat for property owners in this area.

Now lets discuss what a flood zone A is. This flood zone was a 1% chance of flooding each year but generally does not contain a base flood elevation. Many rural parts of Marion county fall within this zone since th base flood elevation has not been determined.

Flood zone AE is the highest risk area outside of coastal areas. This area also has a 1% chance of flooding within a given year. The difference is flood zone AE has a determined base flood elevation. A large part of downtown area of Columbia Mississippi falls within this flood risk exposing business owners and government facilities.

 

So who will be impacted by these changes?

There is a good news and bad news here, Let's talk about the good news first.

There are roughly a 125 property owners who will be removed from high risk flood zones. This means if you have a mortgage that you will be getting a letter from your mortgage company that flood insurance is no longer required on your property.

Now lets talk about the bad news.

Roughly 740 property owners will be moved from low risk areas to high risk areas.

So how will you be notified? Well generally these changes are published in the local newspaper and by the city council.

However if you have a mortgage the notification process will go further. Mortgage companies conduct their audit of the special flood hazard areas.

So let's say you do have a mortgage. Generally you will receive a letter in the mail from your mortgage company stating that your property has been placed in a special flood hazard area. The letter will normally give you 45 days to get coverage in place before the mortgage company purchases a policy on your behalf.

So what are your options then?

Well there are three choices

  1. Flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program
  2. Flood insurance through the private flood insurance market
  3. Appeal for a letter of map amendment

 

National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program also known as NFIP is the government funded flood insurance program. It was originally set up in 1968 to help residents along the Mississippi river.

When these flood insurance rate map changes take place in Marion county there are two options through NFIP.

  1. Standard flood insurance policy
  2. Newly mapped policy

You can setup a standard flood insurance policy which generally carries a 30 day wait period with it. This will satisfy the 45 day rule by the mortgage company. However if you are not careful you could be paying more than you should.

If your property was recently moved from a flood zone X to an A or AE then you qualify for newly mapped rates the first 12 months after the change. FEMA gives property owners a break the first year.

Its not uncommon to have a standard rate of $1500 a year and a newly mapped rate of $500 a year. Once the first 12 months is up you will start to see high rate increases until the policy is fully rated.

Don't get disappointed though there is still another option for flood insurance. Residents in Columbia Mississippi and Marion county have access to private flood insurance.

So do you qualify for private flood insurance? Well it could depend on the type of loan that you have on the property. Lets discuss some scenarios

  1. FHA loans-require NFIP policies
  2. VA loans- allow private flood insurance
  3. USDA loans- allow private flood insurance
  4. Conventional loans- allow private flood insurance

So what are the benefits to having a private flood insurance policy in Mississippi?

 

Private Flood                                                    NFIP

Coverages above $250k                      Coverage up to $250k

Contents above $100k                          Contents up to $100k

Living expenses available               Living expenses not available

Premium savings up to 50%             FEMA sets the rates

 

As you can see there are some big differences between the NFIP and private flood insurance. Its important that you understand all the options in Columbia Mississippi. Both flood insurance options have strict guidelines for cancellations. NFIP only lets you move a policy to the private market at the renewal. On private you can move a policy from one company to the next but you could lose a lot of money.

Many private flood insurance companies in Mississippi have minimum earned guidelines that range from 25-100%. This means that if you cancel they keep that portion of the premium.

As you can see with these changes come alot of moving parts and it can be difficult to truly understand your flood risk. So if you have questions about these new flood zones in Columbia and Marion county make sure to visit our website Flood Insurance Guru. You can also check out our Youtube channel or Facebook page The Flood Insurance Guru or our podcast The Flood Guru.